A Scout Tee sewn from an old beach sarong…and how to fold your shirts for traveling

From beach sarong to T-shirt! I bought a beach sarong on a trip to Brazil a few years ago (made in Indonesia, ironically) and after a while the fine woven fabric had ripped. Ruing the loss of these great colours and print, I regretfully tossed it into my textile recycling bag, but a few weeks later I realized that this sarong would make a great lightweight T-shirt. I’m not normally a fan of tees made of woven fabric but these colours demanded I give Grainline Studio’s Scout Tee a shot.

Scout Tee

Much has been written about the Scout Tee as many sewists have made it, so I won’t say much except to add that the cut is way too generous. I cut the size that corresponded to my body measurements but was still swimming in it width-wise. I ended up taking it in along the sides by at least 2 or 3 inches. Oh and I’ll also add this comment: I don’t get the hype around the Scout Tee. This pattern costs $16 US which is a small fortune for such a basic tee. ‘Nuff said.

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Recently I went to Berlin for a vacation. Here are a couple of shots taken inside the Hamburger Banhof museum of contemporary art in Berlin.

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Having done a lot of traveling in my life, I was shocked to learn only a few months ago that there is a GENIUS way to fold your shirts for packing that I hadn’t previously known about. This is a life-changer, folks! Or, at least, a travel-changer. This method creates a snug little self-contained sausage roll that won’t unfold in your suitcase. Here’s how to do it:

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Step 1: lay the shirt out face-down and smooth out any wrinkles

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Step 2: turn up the bottom edge by about 12cm/4 – 5 inches as if you were turning up a pant cuff

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Step 3: fold in one side by a third. Fold the sleeve neatly if necessary.

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Step 3: fold in the other side to overlap and fold the sleeve in so you have a long rectangle.

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Step 4: starting at the top, begin tightly rolling the shirt down towards the turned-up hem.

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Roll all the way to the bottom, smoothing out wrinkles as you go.

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Step 5: flip the turned-up hem to wrap around the rolled shirt to hold everything in place.

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That’s it! Now you have a neatly rolled up bundle that you can throw in a suitcase and it won’t unfold into a jumbled mess!

Rolled up T-shirts in packing cube

It’s even better if you put your little sausage-rolled shirts into a packing cube like this one…they come in various sizes and make rifling through your suitcase a breeze, with no re-folding necessary.

As long as we’re on the subject of travel, please enjoy some snaps of street art I took around Berlin.

  

A model of the Titanic made of chocolate…and a chocolate Brandenburg Gate in the background. Spot the excited Lori.

 

Phew! Time for a beer…or two.

I made a point of taking pictures at two very different fabric depots in Berlin…will share those with you in another post.

Thanks for stopping by!

Haute Skinny Pants and Plantain Tee

An alternate title for this post could be: A Demonstration of How Much My Camera Sucks at Capturing the Colour Coral. That hot pink shirt that’s currently burning a hole in your retinas? It’s actually coral.

Deer & Doe Plantain Tee and Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

And those large-scale floral pants that are also currently burning a hole in your retinas? Well, I have no excuse for those. That’s exactly how they look. I mean, who am I to walk away from wildly colourful Bird of Paradise stretch cotton fabric without turning it into something loud to wear??

Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

The pants are Haute Skinny Pants by Wardrobe by Me. They are (very) high-waisted skinny pants with an invisible side zip, designed for a medium-weight woven with 3 to 6% stretch, or a ponte knit. The negative ease and 3/8″ seam allowance scared me into cutting a size 4 instead of a 2, but ultimately I did a lot of taking in around the waist and thighs so I probably could have gone with the smaller size.

Deer & Doe Plantain Tee and Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

They have a waist facing that is fairly deep at the front, which helps keep the tummy in check. Love that. The only thing I didn’t love about the pattern was it didn’t include hip pockets. I have a hard time understanding the point of pants without hip pockets. Spare change, lip balm, office keys…these don’t fit conveniently in back pockets! So I added them in using this Burda tutorial on adding hip pockets as a guide.

Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

Is it bad that there’s a bouquet of bird of paradise leaves sprouting from my crotch? I’m rolling with it. There could be worse things… 😉

I bought the material from Fabricland. I’m not that thrilled with it as it started to pooch out around the knees pretty soon after I started wearing the pants. Not sure how you would test for this problem in fabric before buying — any advice?

I wore these pants to a hair appointment on what has become the most hipstery strip in all of Toronto — Ossington Ave between Queen and Dundas — and one woman working in the salon complimented me very emphatically on my pants. So I must be doing something right if I’ve got the hipsters on board!

Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

The back pocket placement is a little problematic. The pockets seemed very low when I marked the placement lines according to the pattern, so I raised them by about 2 cm / 1″ before stitching them on. I think they still look too low on the butt. If I make these again, I intend to raise the pockets by at least another 3 cm. But it’s not such a big deal here, as the busy print camouflages the pockets.

Deer & Doe Plantain Tee and Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

I intentionally turned up a very long hem allowance so that I could turn up cuffs at the ankles as I’m wearing them here, without showing the wrong side of the fabric.

Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

In a bizzarre, unplanned, probably never-to-be-repeated, happy accident, I seem to have purchased fabric for a top that I can actually wear with the loud pants I made! Solid colour for the win! This is the free Plantain Tee from Deer & Doe that I made with a wonderfully soft modal jersey I bought at Affordable Textiles on Queen Street West in Toronto. Sooooooo comfortable. And look at that neckband — NAILED IT! (Gotta celebrate these minor major sewing victories, no?)

Deer & Doe Plantain Tee

The tee has a comfortable a-line shape and 3 choices for sleeves: short, 3/4, or long. I found it to be quite fitted, so I switched from 5/8″ seam allowances to 3/8″ seam allowances before sewing the side seams. It worked out well.

Deer & Doe Plantain Tee and Wardrobe by Me Haute Skinny Pants

It’s been quite some time since I’ve blogged but I do have a lot of projects to share with you. My poor #unsungsewingbloghero husband has been hustling hard with the camera lately trying to catch up! So I look forward to sharing lots more with you over the next few weeks.

Deer & Doe Plantain Tee

Thanks for stopping by!

When Sewjo goes MIA and you’re like WTF? FML! And getting it back FTW

Clothes Making Mavens podcast Episode 9: Missing Sewjo

Helena and I haven’t had a chat on our podcast for a while. Turns out we’ve both had a case of missing sewjo…and missing blogjo, not to mention podjo. (Sorry, seems I’ve got a case of overkilljo happening right now.) But we finally got our act together and compared notes on some of the things that get in the way of sewing, and some strategies for getting back in the saddle. Why don’t you have a listen to our latest Clothes Making Mavens podcast and join in the conversation?

What about you? What causes your desire to sew go out the window? And what revives your sewjo? We’d love to feature your stories on our next podcast so leave a comment here, or better yet, leave us a voicemail at (+1)-401-64MAVEN or visit our webpage that will record your message using your computer’s built-in microphone.

Clothes Making Mavens - a sewing podcast about handmade fashion

Female Genital Mutilation in Kenya: a call to action for the sewing community

Cast your eye upon these glorious colours worn by a group of Maasai women I met in Kenya recently! I travelled there with a group of my university students to learn more about the cultural tradition of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM; also sometimes referred to as Female Genital Cutting or FGC), and to meet young residents of a slum in the capital city Nairobi. What an experience!

MaasaiWomen

One of our goals on this trip, in partnership with AMREF Canada (African Medical Research and Education Foundation), was to shoot a short documentary about AMREF’s efforts to help phase out Female Genital Mutilation in rural Kenyan communities. My students are studying media production, so this was an opportunity for them to put the professional skills they’re learning into practice while finding out about international development issues and immersing themselves in a different culture. And guess what? There’s even a sewing angle to all of this, so stay tuned! And guess what else? I’m going to ask you to make a donation to a great cause if you can, so be warned!

If you haven’t heard of FGM before, it’s a long-standing tradition in certain communities of ‘circumcising’ a girl to mark her passage from girlhood to womanhood. FGM involves partial or total removal of the external genitalia (the clitoris and labia). While the practice is technically illegal in Kenya, it is such a deep-rooted tradition in some communities that many families consider a girl to be unclean and unfit for marriage if she has not been cut. There is a belief that uncut women cannot be thought of as real women, and that they are likely to be unfaithful in their marriage. FGM, particularly in rural areas, is performed without anaesthetic in unsanitary conditions, sometimes even using cow dung to staunch the bleeding. The procedure causes excruciating pain, and girls can die of loss of blood or infection. We spoke with several girls and women who knew someone who died because of the procedure. They described to us in vivid detail how village men are needed to hold ropes attached to the girls’ legs and arms to keep them completely immobile and unable to run away during the procedure. FGM can also cause sexual dysfunction, complications in childbirth, and greatly increases a woman’s risk of HIV infection. It is generally carried out on adolescent girls as young as 8 years old. Once a girl is cut, she is considered ready for marriage and usually must also stop attending school. For obvious reasons, FGM is considered to be a violation of human rights.

That’s a lot to process — I know. A real-life horror show.

The United Nations Population Fund has an FAQ about Female Genital Mutilation here.

So on to the good news: AMREF is working hard to implement “Alternative Rites of Passage” (ARP), whereby the girls still go through a ceremony to mark their passage to womanhood, but without being cut. In order for this to happen, AMREF must ensure everyone including the village chiefs (men) and the young men who would marry the young women understand the risks and outcomes and agree to stop the practice. AMREF does this through education, as well as providing training to the elder women who normally earn a living performing circumcisions. These women are retrained to become traditional birth attendants, so they can continue to earn a living but also contribute to healthy outcomes for girls and women. In place of the cut, the girls attend two or three days of sexual and reproductive health education as well as instruction on why they should stay in school and pursue an education.

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Over 10 thousand girls in Africa have been through AMREF’s ARP program…that means over 10 thousand girls who have not had to endure the cut. Bravo, AMREF!

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Above is Beverly (18 years old) and her uncle Lelein. Beverly was expected by her parents to undergo FGM, but when the time came, she ran away. Girls who refuse FGM or run away can be beaten and/or ostracized from their family and community. Luckily for Beverly, her uncle Lelein was sympathetic and took her in. She is still estranged from her father who believes she must be cut. But Beverly has now finished high school and hopes to be able to attend university to study law. We sat in on a talk she gave to a class of high school girls to encourage them to believe in themselves and finish their education. She is quite an inspiration.

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That’s me with some women from a village called Oldonyonyoki. The woman in the centre used to perform the circumcisions, but these women and their village elders have embraced AMREF’s Alternative Rites of Passage so their girls will no longer be forced to endure FGM. And look at that amazing traditional Maasai beadwork the women have created. (Oh, and since you’re normally here to read about sewing and DIY, I’m wearing a dress I decided I HAD to make a couple of days before the trip using McCall’s 5890. Why do I put myself through that stress just before a big trip? Do you do that, too?)

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Beautiful Maasai woman

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In the village of Oldonyonyoki, a traditional Maasai homestead or ‘boma’

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My students shooting an interview with a former circumciser

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Thanks to AMREF and the work of her village elders, this lucky baby girl won’t have to face FGM!

Would you support AMREF’s amazing work in helping to eradicate Female Genital Mutilation? Please visit my donor page to make a donation to AMREF. I wouldn’t ask you if I hadn’t seen for myself how effective AMREF has been at tackling this massive issue…not only are they saving girls from FGM but so many more girls are staying in school, which makes them better able to care for their families and better contributors to their society. The Alternative Rites of Passage program is making a real, tangible difference not only in the lives of these girls but also for their entire communities. What a great cause. I’ve seen how the sewing community can rally around a great cause before and I’m hoping I can fire us up for this one. 🙂

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Some of my students and the villagers of Oldonyonyoki

At the risk of being frivolous (a-hem) after all that, here’s a better look at the dress I made from McCall’s 5890, View E, using a cotton jersey knit I had in my stash. We were told before our trip that we’d need to dress somewhat conservatively , so no mini skirts or shorts. This midi-length dress isn’t what I’d choose to wear normally, but it was the right amount of cover and loose enough to be perfect in the Kenyan heat.

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I have so much more to share with you, including our time spent at AMREF’s drop-in centre for street kids in the Dagoretti slum of Nairobi — where kids can learn, among other things, how to SEW! — plus pics from our weekend safari. That’s coming up in another post soon!

Thanks so much for reading. And please do consider making a donation to support AMREF if you can.

 

 

 

 

What’s It Like to Swear Off Buying Any Clothes for a Year?

Clothes Making Mavens - a sewing podcast about handmade fashion

Madame Tifaine knows the answer. She spent a year on a ready-to-wear fast and sewed everything she needed. Have a listen to the latest episode of the Clothes Making Mavens podcast, in which I talk to Tif about why she did it and what she learned along the way. Enjoy!

You can also visit Madame Tifaine’s blog to see her lovely makes.

Clothes Making Mavens podcast - episode 8 - Madame Tifaine

I Was Smiling the Whole Time

There’s no doubt we could use more reasons to smile lately. It’s been a while since I’ve knitted something that made me excited to plan, happy to knit, and gleeful to wear. But this neck warmer was just the ticket!

Happy sheep cowl neck warmer

This is the I’ll Pack a Cowl for Rhinebeck by Deb Jacullo. Pssst — it’s FREE! Another reason to smile.

Sheep neckwarmer cowl

I made a couple of modifications to the pattern. I made the cowl smaller in circumference by leaving off one of the sheep from the chart, and since the chart is repeated twice, that means the width of two sheep were left off the circumference. This resulted in a closer-fitting neck warmer which I much prefer — I’ve never understood the use of scarf or cowl that gapes open around your neck…but then again, I do have a serious hate-on for any kind of cool breeze getting anywhere near my neck. It was a 7-stitch wide sheep, so I just cast on 14 fewer stitches to start and went from there.

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Umm, those are snowflakes in my hair, not dandruff. Just sayin’.

I also made the neck warmer less tall by leaving off a few extra rows of ribbing at the top and bottom. If I did it again I would probably leave out some rounds below the sheep, as it’s still a bit too tall for me. Regardless, I feel happy whenever I’m sporting this cozy-cute thing! I highly recommend it as a pattern. And if you’re new to colour knitting, this is a great first project to give it a try. There are 4 colours in total but you only ever have to deal with two colours at a time in any given row, so it’s not terribly complex. It’s a great yarn stash busting project as well.

Here are a couple more things that make me happy: handmade knit socks. Watching the stripes and patterns develop makes them fun to knit, and wearing hand knit socks in winter is one of life’s great pleasures. Wool is naturally breathable like no other sock material I’ve ever tried, so it keeps you warm but if you do start to sweat you don’t get that horrible clammy feeling.

Basic Ribbed Socks pattern by Kate Atherley, knit with Regia sock yarn

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Basic Ribbed Socks pattern by Kate Atherley, knit with Turtlepurl Perfect Pair sock yarn

I must’ve knit myself about 8 pairs of socks in the last few years, and I’ve used this same Basic Ribbed Socks pattern by Kate Atherley every time. (More free pattern happiness!) Occasionally I think I should try another type of sock design but I’m so happy with the fit of these that I figure why mess with a good thing? But I must admit that a few patterns have  made me consider cheating on poor Ms Atherley, like these Dotty Knots Socks — because colour! Or these Watermelon Slice Socks — because, well, watermelon! Or these Nightingale socks — because, holy shit, drop-dead gorgeous show-stopping outrageousness! So many happy-making sock pattern choices.

Here’s another thing that’s making me happy: next week I am leaving for a trip to Kenya. I’m taking a group of my university students who will be producing a short documentary as well as content for a social media campaign for AMREF — the African Medical Research and Education Foundation. We’ll be visiting AMREF’s drop-in centre for kids from the Dagoretti slum of Nairobi, where at-risk kids can make art, learn media production, learn cooking, and learn SEWING! We’ll also be spending a week in a Maasai village learning about AMREF’s Alternative Rites of Passage project, which aims to phase out the dangerous (and illegal) tradition of female genital mutilation by helping girls, village elders, and the young men the girls might marry to understand the risks involved with FGM, and to implement new traditions for this rite of passage from girlhood to womanhood. Last week we were lucky enough to have a young woman from Kenya named Nice visit our class to tell her story. As an 8-year-old, she was scheduled to do her rite of passage, which involves having the clitoris and parts of or all of the labia removed without anaesthetic. She and her older sister ran away the morning of the ceremony, and were beaten when they were caught. Nice ran away again when the ceremony was rescheduled, and has been working with AMREF ever since to help spread the concept of an alternative rite of passage. Happily she has become a leader in her community and travels around the world to help raise awareness.

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Nice, third from left, and part of my team traveling to Kenya next week. Photo by Jennifer Foulds.

AMREF is doing amazing work and I’m so happy that my young students have an opportunity to learn about a completely different culture and have their perspectives and minds expanded. Open minds are another thing we could use more of these days, don’t you think?

I’m looking forward to telling you about my travels when I return. But beware, I’ll also be asking you to help support AMREF! I figure an organization that is providing sewing lessons to kids in need would be A-OK in your books, and worthy of support. Here’s a link to donate if you’re interested. AMREF is a registered charity and can provide tax receipts for your donation. http://www.amrefcanada.org/ryerson

What are the things that are making you happy these days?

Thanks so much for stopping by for a read!

Named Talvikki Sweatshirt

Heather Lou made me do it! She looked so great in her Named Talvikki Sweatshirt that I had a second look at this pattern that I had previously passed over.

Named Talvikki Sweater

Named Talvikki Sweater Back

I like the minimalist design of this sweater, particularly the darts around the neckline which form the funnel neck. I must admit that I very happily and cluelessly applied non-stretch interfacing to my stretch fabric neck facing. (At least I have a consistent M.O.) Luckily, the neck opening was wide enough to fit over my pea-head without stretching (or, at least with the sound of only one stitch snapping) so disaster was (mostly) averted.

Named Talvikki Sweater Funnel Neck

I sewed this with a sweatshirt fabric I bought from L’oiseau Fabrics, a terrific online fabric retailer that carries a ton of knits. The pattern calls for a medium- to heavy-weight stretch fabric, providing enough body for the sweater to look fairly structured, and this fabric fits the bill. The design of this pattern can definitely elevate plain sweatshirt fleece from schlubby to smart. (Which is hard to say out loud…try it. lol)

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I modified the pattern to make it slightly longer so I can wear leggings and have my butt covered, and the side slits don’t go up quite as high. There’s no point in having too much ventilation in a cool-weather sweater, amirite?

As I’m putting this post together, I realize that this *looks* better than I *feel* in it. I feel a bit dwarfed by the roominess of this sweater. I find the sleeves to be ginormous — very wide armholes and sleeves. I’m tempted to zip the serger up the sleeve sides to trim them down a bit.

Named Talvikki Sweater

With special guest appearance by Ernie’s tail

Some great ideas I’ve read for this pattern around the blogosphere include:

  • sew it in ponte knit
  • sew it in boiled wool (as Named’s sample was done)…definitely in a class above sweatshirt fleece
  • add a short exposed zipper to the back or the neck, or even up the side of one shoulder

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Named Talvikki Sweater

Thanks for stopping by for a read!

Perfect PJs

I can’t think of a more appropriate project to sew just a few days before Christmas!

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This is Burda’s onesie pyjamas (12/2016 #103). As soon as I saw their photo, I realized I had the perfect heather grey knit fabric that had been sitting in my stash for 2 years.

I seem to recall that this knit was labeled Marc Jacobs or some such thing when I bought it at Mood in NYC. I considered it for a number of different patterns over time but always rejected it because I realized that the daisy motif was a bit twee for a garment. Then I saw this pyjama pattern and it was a match made in heaven! The fabric is the perfect weight for pyjies…soft and warm.

Burda onesie pyjamas

I used buttons instead of snaps. Snaps would have been more convenient but when I took this into my favourite shop for adding snaps and rivets, the guy there advised against them since I hadn’t interfaced the button band. He thought pulling on the snaps might eventually tear the fabric…so if you’re thinking of making this pattern, definitely add interfacing.

I couldn’t for the life of me figure out how to make the bottom of the button band square…I think I mis-sewed that seam so a rectangular finish was not possible. Burda, I’m sure I’m not the only sewist who wished you had some damn illustrations in your instructions.

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I cut and sewed the smallest size — 36, which is often too big for me. I ended up shortening the legs and arms quite a bit and taking in the sides of the torso, adding a slight bit of waist shaping while I was at it. It’s still quite roomy but the fit is perfect for lounging and sleeping.

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And this is me shaking my be-pyjied butt because I am so damn excited to have the perfect pyjamas for Christmas!

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Just right for rugging up with hand knit socks, a good book, and a purring cat…which is pretty much my definition of a perfect Christmas holiday.

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Here’s wishing you a wonderful holiday season! ❤

 

Take These Scraps And…

My city has a pretty amazing recycling program, accepting just about anything for recycling…compost, styrofoam, glass, plastic bags; you name it…except textiles.

where to recycle fabric scraps

Now I know you all share the secret shame of home sewists: producing extraordinary amounts of little scraps of fabric that can’t be used for much of anything except landfill.

Why this is a problem is summed up well by Craig and Marc Kielburger in their article “We Shouldn’t Be Filling Up Our Landfills With Clothing”:

In North America, consumers are buying — and getting rid of — five times as much clothing as we did 25 years ago, reports Elizabeth Cline in her book Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion (Portfolio, 2013). A staggering 85 per cent of our collective apparel ends up in a landfill — that’s over 10.5 million tons of clothing, according to the popular second-hand store Value Village. In a single year, Canada produces enough textile waste — clothing and other goods like upholstery — to create a mountain three times the size of Toronto’s Rogers Centre stadium.

It’s easy to donate used clothing for reuse (although even the Goodwills and Salvation Armies and Value Villages of the world are now having a very hard time even keeping up with all of the clothing donations being sent their way), but what about those offcuts from sewing? I spent a lot of time researching options near me for recycling fabric but short of driving them to a depot over a hundred kilometres away, there were few. Between fabric scraps, old worn-out clothing, and bed sheets that have reached the end of their life, I have two garbage bags full of textiles waiting in the basement for a recycling option.

Good news! Clothing retailer H&M will take them off your hands and recycle them. And since there seems to be an H&M within a 2 block radius of every man, woman and child in the western world, hopefully that means this is an option for you, dear reader.

fabric recycling

They offer a coupon for $5 off your next purchase of $30 or more for each bag you bring in, just in case you need more incentive than simply feeling imperious for having saved your scraps from going to landfill.

Funny story: I brought a bag of scraps and worn out clothes to an H&M a few months ago, and when I put it into the collection bin (which was much like a fast-food restaurant trash bin with a push-door at the top front), the whole bin fell apart with a giant clatter. First the sides fell open, hitting the floor with a deafening slap, and then the rest came crashing down while I stood there burning bright red for having attracted the attention of every single person in the store. Then a gum-chewing teenage employee comes up to me and says “next time, just give it to someone at the cash!” Thanks, smart ass. Next time, empty your fucking bin out before it bursts at the seams! lol

Anyway, hopefully your experience recycling your fabric scraps will be a little less traumatic than mine was. 😉

Do you have options near you for recycling fabric scraps and clothes that are too far gone for reusing?

 

Doing This Was *SO* Worth It

So this is a thing I did…

Kondo'd drawer

I was getting sick of having to dump out my dresser drawers every couple of months to re-fold the jumbled hot mess they inevitably became. Where is that damn black turtleneck?? <riffle riffle ruffle> Don’t I have a purple long sleeved Tee in here somewhere?? <ruffle toss riffle> Why won’t this drawer close properly?? <grunt urgh %^&$>

I’m quite late to the hype party but Marie Kondo’s bestselling book from 2014 on tidying up describes a way to fold your clothes so they’ll stand up in neat rows like this. (If you’re a cynic like me, you can skip the part about caressing the garment to communicate your gratitude and affection to it.) I decided to give the method a try and it has actually made getting dressed in the morning SO. MUCH. EASIER.

I can see all my clothes at a glance! Folding laundry takes a little extra time, but that tiny bit of extra time is paying off in sanity dividends.

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You can use shoe boxes or other dividers as I have above, but I found it’s really not necessary, particularly if you have enough clothes to fill the drawer — they will hold each other up nicely.

Besides making my mornings easier, this new arrangement also forces me to consider what’s in the drawer before I add something new to it. If there isn’t enough room, then I have to choose something to donate in order to make room. I used to just shove new things into drawers until they were all bursting at the seams, and I’d forget I owned half the things that were in there.

Another bonus: the clothes have less wrinkles in them now. Smoothing out the garment before folding into these neat little bundles helps. As does not having a drawer full of rumpled up messes. 😉

Kondo'd drawers

How do you organize your clothes? Any good tips for closets?