Perfect PJs

I can’t think of a more appropriate project to sew just a few days before Christmas!

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This is Burda’s onesie pyjamas (12/2016 #103). As soon as I saw their photo, I realized I had the perfect heather grey knit fabric that had been sitting in my stash for 2 years.

I seem to recall that this knit was labeled Marc Jacobs or some such thing when I bought it at Mood in NYC. I considered it for a number of different patterns over time but always rejected it because I realized that the daisy motif was a bit twee for a garment. Then I saw this pyjama pattern and it was a match made in heaven! The fabric is the perfect weight for pyjies…soft and warm.

Burda onesie pyjamas

I used buttons instead of snaps. Snaps would have been more convenient but when I took this into my favourite shop for adding snaps and rivets, the guy there advised against them since I hadn’t interfaced the button band. He thought pulling on the snaps might eventually tear the fabric…so if you’re thinking of making this pattern, definitely add interfacing.

I couldn’t for the life of me figure out how to make the bottom of the button band square…I think I mis-sewed that seam so a rectangular finish was not possible. Burda, I’m sure I’m not the only sewist who wished you had some damn illustrations in your instructions.

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I cut and sewed the smallest size — 36, which is often too big for me. I ended up shortening the legs and arms quite a bit and taking in the sides of the torso, adding a slight bit of waist shaping while I was at it. It’s still quite roomy but the fit is perfect for lounging and sleeping.

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And this is me shaking my be-pyjied butt because I am so damn excited to have the perfect pyjamas for Christmas!

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Just right for rugging up with hand knit socks, a good book, and a purring cat…which is pretty much my definition of a perfect Christmas holiday.

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Here’s wishing you a wonderful holiday season! ❤

 

Take These Scraps And…

My city has a pretty amazing recycling program, accepting just about anything for recycling…compost, styrofoam, glass, plastic bags; you name it…except textiles.

where to recycle fabric scraps

Now I know you all share the secret shame of home sewists: producing extraordinary amounts of little scraps of fabric that can’t be used for much of anything except landfill.

Why this is a problem is summed up well by Craig and Marc Kielburger in their article “We Shouldn’t Be Filling Up Our Landfills With Clothing”:

In North America, consumers are buying — and getting rid of — five times as much clothing as we did 25 years ago, reports Elizabeth Cline in her book Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion (Portfolio, 2013). A staggering 85 per cent of our collective apparel ends up in a landfill — that’s over 10.5 million tons of clothing, according to the popular second-hand store Value Village. In a single year, Canada produces enough textile waste — clothing and other goods like upholstery — to create a mountain three times the size of Toronto’s Rogers Centre stadium.

It’s easy to donate used clothing for reuse (although even the Goodwills and Salvation Armies and Value Villages of the world are now having a very hard time even keeping up with all of the clothing donations being sent their way), but what about those offcuts from sewing? I spent a lot of time researching options near me for recycling fabric but short of driving them to a depot over a hundred kilometres away, there were few. Between fabric scraps, old worn-out clothing, and bed sheets that have reached the end of their life, I have two garbage bags full of textiles waiting in the basement for a recycling option.

Good news! Clothing retailer H&M will take them off your hands and recycle them. And since there seems to be an H&M within a 2 block radius of every man, woman and child in the western world, hopefully that means this is an option for you, dear reader.

fabric recycling

They offer a coupon for $5 off your next purchase of $30 or more for each bag you bring in, just in case you need more incentive than simply feeling imperious for having saved your scraps from going to landfill.

Funny story: I brought a bag of scraps and worn out clothes to an H&M a few months ago, and when I put it into the collection bin (which was much like a fast-food restaurant trash bin with a push-door at the top front), the whole bin fell apart with a giant clatter. First the sides fell open, hitting the floor with a deafening slap, and then the rest came crashing down while I stood there burning bright red for having attracted the attention of every single person in the store. Then a gum-chewing teenage employee comes up to me and says “next time, just give it to someone at the cash!” Thanks, smart ass. Next time, empty your fucking bin out before it bursts at the seams! lol

Anyway, hopefully your experience recycling your fabric scraps will be a little less traumatic than mine was. 😉

Do you have options near you for recycling fabric scraps and clothes that are too far gone for reusing?

 

Doing This Was *SO* Worth It

So this is a thing I did…

Kondo'd drawer

I was getting sick of having to dump out my dresser drawers every couple of months to re-fold the jumbled hot mess they inevitably became. Where is that damn black turtleneck?? <riffle riffle ruffle> Don’t I have a purple long sleeved Tee in here somewhere?? <ruffle toss riffle> Why won’t this drawer close properly?? <grunt urgh %^&$>

I’m quite late to the hype party but Marie Kondo’s bestselling book from 2014 on tidying up describes a way to fold your clothes so they’ll stand up in neat rows like this. (If you’re a cynic like me, you can skip the part about caressing the garment to communicate your gratitude and affection to it.) I decided to give the method a try and it has actually made getting dressed in the morning SO. MUCH. EASIER.

I can see all my clothes at a glance! Folding laundry takes a little extra time, but that tiny bit of extra time is paying off in sanity dividends.

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You can use shoe boxes or other dividers as I have above, but I found it’s really not necessary, particularly if you have enough clothes to fill the drawer — they will hold each other up nicely.

Besides making my mornings easier, this new arrangement also forces me to consider what’s in the drawer before I add something new to it. If there isn’t enough room, then I have to choose something to donate in order to make room. I used to just shove new things into drawers until they were all bursting at the seams, and I’d forget I owned half the things that were in there.

Another bonus: the clothes have less wrinkles in them now. Smoothing out the garment before folding into these neat little bundles helps. As does not having a drawer full of rumpled up messes. 😉

Kondo'd drawers

How do you organize your clothes? Any good tips for closets?